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Mother Africa

I read this article on FaceBook Dec 13-20“WHAT AN AMAZING PIECE DESCRIBING SA. Despite being grateful to be in a country where there is basic safety for all, ohhhh the magic of Africa runs deep……. May my birth mother survive what is being done unto her, by those who do not know her value and do not appreciate her true beauty…

Author J. Ikin

I sit here quietly thinking about what it means to me to be South African, a visitor to South Africa or even African. It seems easier to explain the effect that this land has on me…

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Trust Yourself, You Did The Right Thing

 

For what it’s worth I have found there is some commonness in the severity levels of events and how we humans respond to them.Dreams 8

One scale said that the following events stressed humans more than others (Laid out in order of their severity):

  1. Death of a loved one.
  2. Divorce.
  3. Moving.
  4. Major illness or injury.
  5. Job loss.

I, for one have suffered all these traumas and I’m certain there are those among you who have suffered some or all as well.

I mention this scale because I am convinced that few people appreciate what a trauma ‘moving home’ is. Greater still would be moving home to another country.

This is where ‘South Africans Moving to Ireland (SA2 Eire)’ features. I am most grateful for the people who founded and manage this site. To say nothing of those that populate it with their stories and requests.

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Lockdown – continued

We may just be able to end the national lockdown safely and re-start the economy – Alan Knott-Craig

BY ALAN KNOTT-CRAIG@GOODTHINGSGUYAPR 7, 2020 70,338 0

Johannesburg, South Africa (7 April 2020) – Alan Knott-Craig wrote an opinion piece that is going viral about how we need to get our minds around why it’s possible to be optimistic about South Africa right now, even during the COVID-19 lockdown.

With all the constant negativity being shared around COVID-19 and lockdown… Knott-Craig’s opinion piece on some of the positives right now is like a breath of fresh air.

He has permitted us to repost it to our readers and we believe it is an incredibly positive outlook in very uncertain times.

Read the full piece below:

South Africa might just get lucky

In February, our country was in bad shape.

Our stock market was over-heated. We were heading for a recession. We were heading for a downgrade. And then COVID-19 happened.

Our stock market collapsed. We’re now in a recession. We’ve now been downgraded.

Before COVID-19, Cyril Ramaphosa was bogged down in ANC political in-fighting, and Eskom was load-shedding every week.

Cyril now has no political opposition, everyone is too busy scrambling to fight the pandemic.

Eskom has stopped load-shedding thanks to the national lockdown easing demand from businesses.

Before progressing, let’s acknowledge that it is possible that this is Armageddon.

Health, economic and political Armageddon. The end.

Millions could die. Millions could lose jobs. Political upheaval could ensue.

Ok, got that.

But it’s also possible that COVID-19 is the best thing to happen to SA since the 2010 Soccer World Cup. South Africa sailed through the Global Financial Crisis thanks to the state-sponsored infrastructure projects for the 2010 World Cup.

We were lucky.

By some bizarre irony, our country’s ongoing battle against TB may just be lucky too.It may just turn out that most South Africans are safe because it’s mandatory to have a Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) vaccination when they are born to prevent life-threatening TB later on.

“We found that countries without universal policies of BCG vaccination, such as Italy, the Netherlands, and the United States, have been more severely affected compared to countries with universal and long-standing BCG policies,” noted the researchers led by Gonzalo Otazu, assistant professor of biomedical sciences at NYIT.

Let’s compare Spain to Portugal.

Portugal forces BCG vaccinations at birth, Spain doesn’t.

As of 5 April 2020:

  • Portugal: 10,524 cases, 266 deceased. 0.1% infection rate. 2.5% death rate.
  • Spain: 126,128 cases, 13,897 deceased. 0.27% infection rate. 9.5% death rate.

Spaniards are almost 3x more likely to get COVID-19, and 10x more likely to die.

India, like Portugal, administers the BCG vaccine to millions of children soon after birth to combat TB (tuberculosis). And like Portugal, Indian has seen a much lower infection rate, especially when you consider the higher risk of infection due to cramped living conditions and poverty.

And yet the USA, where there are no mandatory BCG vaccinations, has the highest number of infections, in spite of the USA’s being is 4x smaller, 28x richer and 13x less populated than India’s.

Thanks to South Africa’s mandatory BCG vaccination policy, we may just be less affected than many countries in the world.

We may just be able to end the national lockdown and re-start the economy.

Ending the lockdown will benefit SA in seven ways:

  1. Millions of jobs will be saved. Millions of families will be rescued from economic hardship.
  2. Universal BCG vaccination gives our country a comparative advantage over countries that don’t, i.e.: all developed countries, and all developing countries that don’t have the systems and/or economic means to enforce mandatory vaccinations.
  3. Cyril Ramaphosa can use the economic crisis as leverage to implement the much-needed structural economic reforms our country needs, without the ANC in-fighting that has previously hamstrung his efforts.
  4. People have opened their eyes to the power of online education. No need to have the world’s best math teacher living in Butterworth. No need to print and deliver millions of textbooks. No matter where you live, you can have a world-class education (assuming you have affordable broadband).
  5. Less flying and driving. Even the most hide-bound of executives have now been forced to telecommute. Turns out it ain’t so hard. Good for traffic. Good for the climate.
  6. It means Eskom’s grid can take a breather whilst essential maintenance is carried out and IPP’s prepare for selling directly to customers, reducing our reliance on Eskom, ultimately creating a stronger and more resilient power grid.
  7. It means the Moody and Fitch downgrades are pretty meaningless. Everyone is being downgraded.

Ending the national lockdown will be the best thing that our government can do to save our economy.

If the positive scenario pans out, South Africa will be the equivalent of a golfer hitting a duck hook into the water, ricocheting off a submerged rock, bouncing back to the green, and the ball coming to rest three feet from the pin.

We may just be pretty damn lucky.

The whole world is in it together, but, by some miracle, South Africa might be the best place to be in it.

Sources: Opinion Piece – Alan Knott-Craig 

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Click the link below to listen to the Good Things Guy Podcast, with Brent Lindeque – South Africa’s very own Good Things Guy. He’s on a mission to change what the world pays attention to, and he truly believes that there’s good news all around us. In the Good Things Guy podcast, you’ll meet these everyday heroes & hear their incredible stories:

We all need to hear positive words about our country’s current status. Even if you do not agree with a particular opinion, its a lot better than the negative vomit that we are receiving from all over the place.

Share this if you think it might lift another person’s spirits.

 

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Chevy Lane – Food Experience with a Difference

Chevy Lane 1

A Restaurant Review.

We decided that we just felt like having a burger and Spur seemed like an obvious choice……..

Continue reading Chevy Lane – Food Experience with a Difference

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The Long Haul

Almost casually, my Son mentioned to me that he was flying down to Cape Town from Johannesburg to ferry a pick-up truck and drive it to his home in Johannesburg.

Typically, alarm bells went off in my mind. I expressed my concern about him attempting a journey like this on his own. A journey, in this case, which would beMap_of_the_N1_(South_Africa)_with_labels.svg traveled mostly at night. The N1 Arterial carries 300,000 vehicles per day and is the second longest road in South Africa, some 1900 kms (1200 miles).

Without giving it thought, I offered to assist with the driving; After a couple of weeks my Son accepted the offer and bought me an airline ticket to Cape Town.

The airline brought me to Cape Town at 11.30 am on a Friday and by 1pm, my Son and I were on the road to Johannesburg!

After the death of my eldest Son to a long-suffering, rare cancer, it was good to spend time with my remaining Boy, however taxing, the drive.

In short, we drove 1400kms (870Mi) in the space of 13 hours, only 4 of those in daylight. Our only stops were for fuel and for take out coffees and toasted sandwiches. I drank 8 cups of coffee along the journey (ordinarily I drink only one cup in the same Engen Wimpytime frame at home, so my eyes were wide open continually)! I don’t drive at night in the normal course of events, when I’m home, primarily because I am partially blinded by oncoming headlights. But I knew many family members and friends were praying for us as we drove though the dark.

A few years back, I would have considered the trip a nightmare, but this time, I loved every minute. We chatted and laughed a great deal. All the while the South bound traffic was passing us at approximately 120 vehicles per hour consistently, 90 % of which were heavy goods vehicles, to say nothing of the slow-moving vehicles moving Northbound (ahead of us). Finally, we arrived home at 3.30am Sunday morning.

We live in a time where much of the population complains, even violently, about the economic, political and poor governance of our country. Among the many complaints is that of the condition of our roads and behavior of lawless drivers – the list is endless.

In closing let me say that every day I extend my gratitude for everything in my life and that includes the roads and other drivers.

On this trip, I would like to say thank you to our Roads Agency for the excellent road surface on the 1400 kms. of the N1. The clear reflective markings on the road, which made driving a lot safer in what was a very dangerous driving condition. The provision of splits in the road that allowed for the overtaking of slower vehicles.

Thank you to the truckers, who do not have an easy or safe livelihood, for their amazing courtesy (headlamp control, moving over where possible).Truckers

Unless it was in the case of great importance, as this journey was, I should not like to do that journey again and I am so grateful to our airline pilots and crew who make flying in our country, safe and comfortable. The airline companies, through their initiative, making flying affordable, enabling me to continue using their services in the future.

“For those who choose to be grateful for that which they have, great is the reward of what will come to them in the future”.

All rights reserved sirpeterjamesdotcom©2018-01-20

 If you feel this article has value, please send this link to others, Writings are meant for people, not for dormant files in our computers and very often when we share them, it results in positive changes in the lives of individuals and communities.

If you are spiritually inclined see my other site; www.adcrucemchristi.com

Please feel free to send in questions (see ‘Contact’) and comments (hit ‘Comments’

button).

 

 

 

 

 

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Saint Pinard

Saint Pinard

 

 

Saint Pinard

I recall some years ago a conversation I had with a French family, concerning my origins. At the time it raised much mirth among them resulting in the only member of the family, who could speak English, confiding in me.

“Peter” he said, “This name, Pinard is a beet of a joke in France”.

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Chevy Lane – Food Experience with a Difference

Chevy Lane 1

A Restaurant Review – Not Sponsored

We decided that we just felt like having a burger and Spur seemed like an obvious choice……..

Continue reading Chevy Lane – Food Experience with a Difference

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Sylvia Rose’s Story – Chapter Nine

I didn’t come here to be average

Never Give Up 7

I have some fabulous news to share with you. In addition; to chat to you about perseverance and why you should not accept when people say you cannot do it. Yes, you can.

Continue reading Sylvia Rose’s Story – Chapter Nine

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I Had A Dream……

Dan The Aviation Man 2

I stood in a fitting room, getting measured for my uniform. My uniform, the royal charcoal & burgundy of the prestigious Qatar Airways.

Qatar Airways, an airline which has either been best or second best airline of the year for the last eight years. I can’t seem to grasp the fact that I am an employee of one of the leaders in the industry.

How did I end up here? To answer that question, I have to take you back a few years, so you will understand where my passion for aviation came from.

Sunderland J (2)
Sunderland ‘J’ Piloted by my Grandfather

My paternal grandfather passed away before I was born and as a result, I never had the opportunity to get to know him. He was a pilot during the great war. I remember spending hours looking at pictures of him in uniform while my grandmother told me about him and his flying years. I loved hearing about the people he met and the places he went. I can’t confidently say how or why this passion began, but I can definitely say, it was intense, consuming and, up until today, an integral part of whom I am.

Over the years, I spent hours reading about the industry, researching airports and learning about aircraft. If anyone was going to the airport, I was sure to be with them. If I knew about an air show happening, I would beg someone to take me. Any time I could incorporate aviation into school projects, I most certainly did.

When the time came for me to finish school and choose a career, aviation was an obvious choice. I just didn’t know which area of aviation exactly. The opportunity to go into avionics presented itself and I was thrilled to be starting my life in aviation. I spent the next three years completing my theoretical modules and doing long practical’s at various airports. Although I was in an industry I loved, this was a time of immense emotional hardship and I struggled through, but I made it; I qualified.

I began searching for jobs locally and then internationally. I was young, passionate and fully qualified, but very few companies got back to me. I can’t remember how many avionics related jobs I applied for, but it was very disheartening to not receive even a single call back.

I saw an advert on Face book for cabin crew with Qatar Airways. They were hosting an open day event in South Africa and I thought that dropping off my documents and saying hello wouldn’t hurt. I didn’t expect to have anything come from it, so I didn’t prepare to stay for any length of time. I got ready in business attire and went to the hotel hosting the open day. I was early, but other applicants started arriving and soon there were close on 600 people. I had long given up hope for this possibility.

Dan The Aviation Man
I Love this Space

Much to my surprise, I was asked to come back the following day. I passed the next round, the next and the next.

Fast forward a few months of jumping through hoops for the airline and there I was, my bags packed with a one-way ticket to Qatar.

I never expected this for my life; for a long time, I thought I would either work on the technical side of aviation or not in aviation at all. I also can’t explain how it happened that my first call back was the only job I applied for outside of avionics.

I find peace in accepting that this was just meant to be and as surprising as it was, I am happier than I have ever been.

all rights reserved DanVentureTravels©2018

This article was contributed by DanVentureTravels, see their site:

https://danventuretravels.com.

If you feel this article has value, please send this link to others, Writings are meant for people, not for dormant files in our computers and very often when we share them, it results in positive changes in the lives of individuals and communities.
If you are spiritually inclined see my other site; http://www.adcrucemchristi.com
Please feel free to send in questions (see ‘Contact’) and comments (hit ‘Comments’
button).

 

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Sylvia-Rose’s Story – Part Two

Depression AJ 12

So that’s what you call Music

One of my daughters lives by the expression, “No matter what life throws at you, get up, dress up and show up” So I’m showing up, as promised, to continue telling you my story, even though life has recently been throwing some serious lemons, with no tequila, my way!

Continue reading Sylvia-Rose’s Story – Part Two