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Ye Espice Ilande

The Wisdom of Crusty Pirates.

It were in the yeare anno domini 1609, when that bold Captain Petre Jamese did seil his vaissel into ye Espice Ilandes, of Mollucos; there to seeke his fortune. For surely, mani were of the espices; notemyge, clufe and cinamone. Greate were wealthe of these to be had for those who were bolde to collecte.

Galleon in Bay
Ye Espice Ilande

Twas a faire daye when Captain seiled into ye bay. His crewe layed anka, after ye trusty vaissel quieted in stille waters of bay.

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The Art of Sabrage

“Sabrage /səˈbrɑːʒ/ is a technique for opening a champagne bottle with a Sabre,[1] used for ceremonial occasions. The wielder slides the Sabre along the body of the bottle to break the top of the neck away, leaving the neck of the bottle open and ready to pour. The force of the blunt side of the blade hitting the lip breaks the glass to separate the collar from the neck of the bottle. One does not use the sharp side of the blade. The cork and collar remain together after separating from the neck.”  Wikipedia

The origins of Sabrage are said to have come from Napoleon’s troops who received gifts of Champagne from people as they rode from their victory ground. They could not open the bottle with one hand on the reign and used their Sabre’s to dislodge the bottle tops.

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Holi-Day of Sir Peter James and The Layde Scarlett.

 On a fayre day, that bold knight, Sir Peter James, did journey to the lands end in his trusty carriage, the Bee-Em-Thrubble-Ewe, with six trusty steeds at the fore.

He rode with his layde, The Layde Scarlett, Princess of all Albertinshire.

That bold knight did leane over to his layde as she slumbered to the rythyme of the swayeing carriage. He whispered to her eayr, ‘My Layde, my love for thee is indeed greatere that that of my lyfe, sleep on and rest thy soul”.

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The Alchemist – by Paulo Coelho

Arabian Warrior

 

A Book Review.
“At that moment, it seemed to him that time stood still and the Soul of the World surged within him. When he looked into her dark eyes and saw that her lips were poised between a laugh and silence, he learned the most important part of the language that the world spoke – the language that everyone was capable of understanding in their heart.
It was love; something older than humanity, more ancient than the desert. Something that exerted the same force whenever two pairs of eyes met, as had theirs, here at the well. She smiled and that was certainly an omen – the omen he had been awaiting, without even knowing he was, for all his life. The omen he had sought to find with his sheep and in his books, in the crystals and in the silence of the desert.
It was the pure language of the world. It required no explanation; just as the universe needs none as it travels through endless time.
What the boy felt at that moment was that he was in the presence of the only woman in his life and that, with no need for words, she recognized the same thing. He was more certain of it than anything in the world. He had been told by his parents and his grandparents that he must fall in love and really know a person before becoming committed.
Maybe people who felt that way had never learned the universal language; it’s easy to understand that someone in the world awaits you, whether it’s in the middle of the desert or in some great city. And when two such people encounter each other, their eyes meet, the past and the future become unimportant. There is only that moment, and the incredible certainty that everything under the sun has been written by one hand only. It is the hand that evokes love, and creates a twin soul for every person in the world. Without such love, one’s dreams would have no meaning.”
Excerpt from ‘The Alchemist’, by Paulo Coelho.
Paulo Coelho must rank among the great contemporary writers of our day. The Alchemist must feature as his very best. As it has sold in excess of 30 million copies, translated into 63+ Languages; it would surely be a candidate for the title of a classic.

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The Art of Sabrage

“Sabrage /səˈbrɑːʒ/ is a technique for opening a champagne bottle with a Sabre,[1] used for ceremonial occasions. The wielder slides the Sabre along the body of the bottle to break the top of the neck away, leaving the neck of the bottle open and ready to pour. The force of the blunt side of the blade hitting the lip breaks the glass to separate the collar from the neck of the bottle. One does not use the sharp side of the blade. The cork and collar remain together after separating from the neck.”  Wikipedia

The origins of Sabrage are said to have come from Napoleon’s troops who received gifts of Champagne from people as they rode from their victory ground. They could not open the bottle with one hand on the reign and used their Sabre’s to dislodge the bottle tops.

Continue reading The Art of Sabrage