Posted on Leave a comment

Things Not To Buy While Traveling

I am unable to reblog to my site and have purely copied from Dan’s. Use this link to reach Dan’s site direct:

When you’re in a new place, it’s easy to spend money. You’ve saved for & planned a holiday, so it is easy to keep the “Treat yourself” attitude alive when it comes to buying things. Whether you’re on a relaxing holiday or exploring new cities, you will come across items that seem exotic & the novelty of not being able to get them at home will persuade you even more. More often than not, these items are not worth the money & your hard-earned money would be better spent on something else. Here’s a list of things I’d suggest skipping on your next trip. I will say that there are, of course, some people who will genuinely buy these things & get great use out of them, but these people are few & far between.

Traditional clothing

Buying clothes & shoes while on a trip is generally a bad idea because you’ll struggle with packing & baggage weight on your way back home. Traditional clothes of the country or city you are visiting is an even worse purchase because they often have a hefty price tag & you will never use them. Most people don’t even wear their own traditional clothes because they’re impractical so they will be even more so for you. It is very easy to get carried away in the moment but think about this clearly before purchasing.

A Tattoo

Just as getting inked after a few drinks is not the best idea, getting a tattoo while on a “holiday high” is probably something you would want to avoid. The design might seem like a wonderful idea at the time, but not be appropriate when you get home. You also don’t know the quality, price & cleanliness of the random parlor you walk into.

Tacky souvenirs

A souvenir is meant to be a memento of a place you visited or a trip you’ve taken. Tacky souvenirs don’t last long &, therefore, waste your money. You’ll also want something nice looking to have on display in your house, right?

Bulky souvenirs

On the topic of souvenirs, buying heavy, fragile, or bulky souvenirs is not a good idea. You will struggle packing these items into your luggage & they have a higher chance of breaking on their way home. I have made this mistake a few too many times.

Hotel food

Whether it is from the restaurants in hotels or room service, hotel food is expensive. More often than not, the quality is not good either. Save yourself some money & go looking for local restaurants. Better yet, be a little adventurous & try some street food

Neck pillow

Okay, so this is not an exotic item. If you’ve followed this blog for some time, you’ll know I hate these things. Neck pillows get forgotten, dropped on the floor, collect all kinds of germs & shoved into overhead compartments on aircraft. Very rarely are they actually used. You might truly believe you will use it, but I highly doubt it.

Things for other people

This is last on the list because this is something I struggle with the most. It’s perfectly fine to buy gifts for your loved ones, but when people find out you’re going to a specific place, they ask you to get things for them. Your colleagues hear you’re headed to Switzerland? They ask for chocolate. That lady in your yoga class asks for skincare products when you return from South Korea. This happens often. I don’t think people realize the cost involved as well as the time it takes to find these items & then the hassle of getting them back home. It’s nice to be nice & do things for other people, but remember that this is your trip & your time.

I hope these have helped & will save you some money in the future.

Oh… and you might be wondering about the featured image for this post; horse poo I saw for sale in New Zealand – yea, don’t buy that while traveling.

Keep traveling, keep safe.

DanVenture Travels : https://danventuretravels.com/2021/08/01/things-to-not-buy-while-traveling/

Please note this article is protected by Copyrite to Danventuretravels. See the above link for details.

Posted on Leave a comment

Lockdown – Day 7

Lockdown!

Day Seven is upon us, with fourteen days to go!

In a country where 75% of our population have a television service and 68% have internet connectivity, 85% have mobile devices; it is safe to say that most of our population are informed of world and countrywide events.

Yet, short of taking ‘house to house’ sample surveys among different income groups would you be able to determine a pattern of how the average person is dealing with the ‘Lockdown’ measures. These measures only allow us an opportunity to escape incarceration when going to the doctor, collecting medicine and foodstuffs from our local pharmacy and supermarket. One would be putting oneself and family members at risk, with every trip to these outlets – so, they could never be considered as a possible ‘break from incarceration.’

The scope of domestic dwelling and its effects on individuals is wide indeed. Do you live on your own, with a partner, do you have children, what are their ages? Up to the lockdown were you employed? What age are you/your partner, the list is long indeed.

As one can see, there is no ‘one size fits all’ in trying to determine how people would be coping. Judging from the above figures, it is safe to say that most people would, at least, have some form of entertainment and communication with others.

This means I’m in no position to tell you what’s happening to people in a lockdown environment.

What I am qualified to share with you is what’s happening in our cave, with the hope it might offer you encouragement, a few hints on safety and hope for the future, whatever that may turn out to be.

My wife and I have a two-bed-roomed unit in a well maintained secure complex. We are in a two kilometer radius from shops, pharmacy and restaurants. Eight kilometers from our physician’s rooms. My wife maintains our unit in spic-n-span condition and that includes regular sanitizing. She does our laundry daily. On shopping trips we don our masks, gloves and maintain strict social distancing. On returning, we sanitize all goods we have purchased. Place our shopping bags in the washing machine. We leave our ,going out shoes’ outside the front door We sanitize all surfaces where shopping was unpacked. Our clothes are removed and put straight into the washing machine. Then we shower, washing all over and dressing with fresh clothing.

We exercise daily inside our unit and go for walks daily within our complex grounds, calling on neighbors who are within our seventy-something age group; especially those that live alone.

My wife is a seamstress and sews; recently making masks, that we have given to our family, friends and neighbors. She maintains a daily journal and is a follower of many talented self-development gurus.

I have a little amount of telephoning work for two clients, once a week and I have a blog site, for which I write articles. I have an e-book manuscript for my first short story book. I am two thirds of the way through my first novel.

We spend time contacting our children, grandchildren, via Whats App’s, House party, and email.

At night we watch videos via Netflix or read.

We have a rule that we never repeat any information that is of a negative nature. We do not run our government down, even if we disagree with them. We only disseminate conversation and articles of a positive and encouraging nature.

This is especially in the case of the younger members of our family, who do not understand the drama of what is taking place and therefore become fearfully anxious and in extreme cases – losing hope.

We do not watch TV or listen to news-feeds. Never lose sight of the fact that the media is a mammoth and ruthless business and not always ethical. Much of the time what they disseminate is inaccurate or downright untrue; yet sadly, we are raised to believe what is dished up for us.

In last week’s article I said:

With any catastrophe there are certainly two issues that will arise in its wake:

  • We can do nothing to change the course of the catastrophe.
  • We can do nothing about the (possibly major) changes that will take place in our lives.

What we can do is train ourselves and our children to think and speak positively; look after ourselves, mentally, physically and spiritually. Do whatever we are easily able for our fellow humans, and trust that, this too will pass and better things are to come, however different they may turn out to be.

Consider:

 The Covid-19 Pandemic:

This virus is a friend come to teach us; whilst the wounds of a friend inflict pain and suffering, they are a godsend compared with the kisses of our enemy. Prov. 27:6.

All rights reserved sirpeterjamesdotcom©2020-04-05

If you feel this article has value, please send this link to others, Writings are meant for people, not for dormant files in our computers and very often when we share them, it results in positive changes in the lives of individuals and communities.

If you are spiritually inclined see my other site; www.adcrucemchristi.com

Please feel free to send in questions (see ‘Contact’) and comments (hit ‘Comments’

button).