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Ireland-The Quiet Man Movie

the_quiet_man+poster-2

Feature Photo: The Quiet Man – Behind the Scenes Mostly Westerns

A Review by sirpeterjames.com.

Here’s a real oldie, shot in Ireland in 1952. The Quiet Man is based on a 1933 Saturday Evening Post short story by Irish novelist Maurice Walsh. The story was adapted for the movie by screenwriters Frank S Nugent and Richard Llewellyn. You may well ask, can there be an appeal for a 70-year-old movie in our day and age? My answer is emphatical, YES! Let me tell you why.

The Appeal.

Firstly it’s shot in Ireland – this means spectacular scenery. Green hills, quaint villages, streams, stoney roads, classic old choo-choo train, horse-driven carriages, and too many others to mention. John Wayne and Maureen O’Hara will be forever fresh and young, even 100 years from now. The storyline is oozing with romance and integrity that you and I can easily imagine for ourselves in today’s world. We have a break from the grim bloodied violence of today’s movies. The quality of both cinematography and sound are perfect. It only cost me 3.49 EUR, if I’d paid three times more it would have been well worth the money. At last, but far from the least of the film’s attributes; it is so humorous, you will be laughing most of the time.

The Story.

The story concerns a man, Sean Thornton (John Wayne), an Irish-born American, who comes to Ireland to seek the home of his birth in a village, White O’Morn, Innisfree, where he hopes to buy the small cottage which his parents owned. In the course of this pursuit, he encounters several obstacles.

The first is that of the altercation he has with Red Will Danaher (Victor McLaglen), who also wants to buy the cottage from a widow, Sarah Tillane (Mildred Natwick). Sean outbids Reds’ offer for the cottage and becomes its new owner.

The second hurdle, in the course of this saga, Sean meets Mary Kate (Maureen O’Hara)– who just happens to be Red’s sister. It’s love at first sight for both of them. But certainly not for Red. He hates Sean with a vengeance. Irish tradition however requires that before Sean and Mary Kate are allowed to be married, red must give his consent.

However, Sean makes friends with a rather influential character, Michaleen Flynn (Barry Fitzgerald) who is in collusion with the local village priest, Father Lonergan, (Ward Bond.) Between these two they think up several interesting ways to hook Red into giving his consent to the marriage.

The Marriage.

The marriage is no bed of roses, in fact, for Sean, no bed at all! It creates another traditional hurdle for Sean who is completely puzzled by the behavior of his Irish neighbors. In short Mary Kate wants Sean to collect a 300-pound dowry to be given her by her brother, which is rightfully hers. Once again, by tradition Sean is to ask his antagonist, Red for the dowry. This is the last straw for him and he flatly refuses. In reaction to this Mary Kate calls Sean a coward. What she does not know is, Sean was a champion heavyweight boxer in America. And because of his massive strength, he tragically killed a man with a single punch in the ring. He is not afraid of Red by any means, only fearful of killing him.

The Fight.

You’re itching to know what happens next, aren’t you? I’m sorry, but you have to see the movie to find out. What I will reassure you of, is this, it will be the best few bucks you’ll ever spend. Okay, I’ll give you a hint. Red and Sean end up having a classic fight. Fought along the Irish version of ‘Queensbury Rules,’ and a ring extending through the village and a river. In this Ireland, you will love and laugh every minute.

If you feel this article has value, please send this link to others. Writings are meant for people, not for dormant files in our computers. Often, when we share them, it results in positive changes in the lives of individuals and communities.

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If you are spiritually inclined see my other site; www.adcrucemchristi.com

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The Field-A Movie About Ireland

A Movie filmed and released in Ireland, in 1990 by Jim Sheridan.

Based on the stage play of the same name written by John B Keene.

(Produced by Gemini Productions at the Olympia Theatre in Dublin in 1965.)

Review by Sir Peter James Dotcome.

I viewed the movie through the courtesy of YouTube, and the quality of the picture and sound were far below par.  Jim Sheridan’s work stemmed from a fictional play by John B Keene and set in County Kerry, Ireland, 1930.  The filming took place in the village of Leenaun, County Galway and the screenplay was that of Jim Sheridan.

Jim, it seems by comparison with the play, used a sizeable amount of poetic license in writing his screenplay.  More about this later.

Ireland is a country where natives fought for the right to own land; they had their fill of being subjugated by landlords from other ethnic and cultural origins.  I don’t think it is unfair to say that the natives of Ireland were angry and bitter.  The great famine of 1845 exacerbated this situation.

The movie tells us a story about a fictional village in 1930s Ireland.  Bull McCabe (Richard Harris,) the protagonist, is an Irish village farmer.  Four primary characters, Bull’s son, Tadgh, Bird, Bull’s sidekick, Mick, publican, and auctioneer.  Finally, the local Priest.  A host of other characters supports these.

Bull is a farmer who rents a small field from a widow and has done so for five years.  Over these years, his dedicated care of the field had yielded fine nutritious fodder for his heifers.  Raising and selling these animals is his livelihood.

The Widow struggles to live on her pension and decides to auction off her field.  Bull tells the local population that he has a right to have the lot as, in his curatorship, the value has increased.  The Widow puts a reserve on the field and awaits the outcome.  Bull sets about various underhanded means to stop the auction from being publicized.  He does this with the aid of Mick, who is managing the auction event.  Bull states that he is willing to pay £50, half of the reserve the Widow has set.

Enter a new character, Peter, an American, the antagonist, who has generational roots in the area.  Peter wants the field to further his business interests and drives the bidding up, forcing Bull to exceed his £50 bid to £80.  Mick halts the auction telling everyone they must return the following day.

Bull and Tadgh, his son, take advantage of the situation and decide to threaten Peter with a beating if he does not leave the village at once.  Waylaying him in the dark, they threaten Peter, and then Bull sets Tadgh up to fight Peter.  Without any further details, save it to say that in the course of the beating Bull accidentally kills Peter.

I’m sure you will want to know more, so watch the movie.

But there is more from me.

For what the movie lacks in quality, it’s explosive on emotion – the actual value.

Irrespective of your belief system, possible empathies for souls suffering at the hands of their landlords over the centuries; You will need some understanding of this situation.

The Priest had warned Bull not to go outside the law in his dealing with the property sale, but Bull retorted by releasing his deeply emotive reasons for wanting the field.

After the murder of Peter (what may have been decided by the court as a case of manslaughter), not one person in the community would assist the police investigative team.  The Priest and Police Sergeant appealed to the community, but to no avail.  The Priest finally gave a fire-and-damnation sermon to the community on Sunday, telling them that not only was the perpetrator guilty of suffering eternally in hell, but they too were liars and equally guilty.  He followed by refusing all rights offered by the church and closing its doors.

While the police were searching in the sea for a mule, killed in anger by Tadgh and Bull, Peter’s body was discovered.  At this point, Bull realized what he had done and lost his mind.

What emerged out of this carnage?

The Widow received the value of her property.  Bird, Bull’s faithful sidekick, was the successful bidder at £101.  Peter lost his life.  His wife was widowed, and his child was subsequently fatherless.  Bull took his life and the lives of his son and livestock.  If you believe the Priest, the community is now under the sword of Damocles’.

How would you judge the morality in this story?

I would not point the finger at any one party (just my point of view here.) But let me share my point of view anyway.

Two businessmen lock horns over an issue.  Both are passionate men wanting their way.

One is from some eight generations of persecution by landlords, mainly of foreign ethnicity.  His philosophy says, ‘ownership of land is everything,’ and his philosophy is followed by powerful emotion, to the point where he places himself above the law.

The other was a successful and seemingly arrogant young man who wanted to appease his wife, an Irish native.  She tried to return to Ireland at any cost.  Possibly his trust in the law was his undoing.  We all know the law is something wealthy lawyers debate in court, charging huge fees.  The law does not offer anyone physical protection.  There is the probability, although having Irish roots, he did not research its painful history sufficiently.

Lastly, I would like to mention that I read the book of the play text in conjunction with viewing the movie.

In his play, Keene’s text has quite a few differences compared to the movie.  Out of interest, why don’t you read the play version and find out for yourself?

Principally, Keene ends his play with murder (no possibility of manslaughter) committed by a man who now has his land and is untouchable by the law.  The community in silent support has packing tape over their lips. Another interesting point is that the antagonist in the play is a certain man named William, who hails from England. I am not certain if the English factor plays a part here, but it bears some thought at least.

What should we make of this find?  Nothing really; one man was writing a play in protest and the other, what he hoped would be a box office hit. What do you think?

If you feel this article has value, please send this link to others. Writings are meant for people, not for dormant files in our computers. Often, when we share them, it results in positive changes in the lives of individuals and communities.

All rights reserved sirpeterjamesdotcom©2020-01-20

If you are spiritually inclined see my other site; www.adcrucemchristi.com

Please feel free to send in questions (see ‘Contact’) and comments (hit the ‘Comments’ Button.)

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Lockdown March 6 2021

Lockdown

How are all you wonderful fellow-humans coping out there in this seemingly endless lockdown pandemic (I don’t know which pandemic is worse, lockdown or covid)?

Dolly Parton is attributed to saying: “I can’t change the wind, but I can adjust my sails.”

I have a saying: “There are probably, at this time, some things I might be able to change with regards to Covid and it’s partner, lockdown. But there is a huge amount that I will never be able to change, no matter how I try. For the sake of my sanity, my choice of which I can and cannot change requires wise reasoning.”

I am happily sane because I made a few wise decisions.

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Why Write? Part six

If you have just joined us, then you need to read previous editions in the series, you will find these here:

With each publication in this series, I was giving you assignments to do and asked you to return these to me for editing. This way you sent in your effort, which I called a ‘submission’ and I send back a ‘correction’ to you. In doing this, you ended up with a comparison.

I am now going to change the system. In future you will not send in submissions, but I will publish my version of the assignment a week later and that way you can compare what you have done with what I have written.

If you have just joined us, you are free to submit the earlier assignments to us for correction, to help get you started.

Continue reading Why Write? Part six

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The Speech

 

The president stood, flanked by high ranking military officers on the raised deck. A little to one side stood a young Marine, who held the Medal of Honor with the two loose ends of a blue ribband. It was a warm day in Washington DC, there might have Medal of Honor 3been, at the very least, two hundred people crowded into the airy flag bedecked room.

An orderly walked on to the deck and signaled the occupants of the room to silence.

“Ladies and Gentlemen, the President of the United States of America!” He stated.

Continue reading The Speech

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Every Dog Has His Day…..

 

“Every Dog has his Day and every Bitch – Two Afternoons.”

(American Proverb)

Dogs

 

 There was once a dog, call “Dog” and his mate called “Bitch”.

They lived in a comfortable suburban home with their owners.

Every day started with a bowl of dog food porridge and every day ended

with a bowl of dry biscuits. In between they drank from bowls of water.

On Sunday’s they were given bones from the owners table, after they

finished their meal.

On being handed their bones,

Dog would run away and bury his bone, returning to snatch Bitch’s

from her, eating it and then saying, “Haven’t you heard,

‘Every Dog has His Day!’ Sunday is my day – ha! ha!”

The following Monday, whilst Dog was fast asleep dreaming of Doggy Bone Land,

Bitch searched until she found Dog’s buried bone, which she ate with relish,

carefully burying the remnants. The following afternoon Bitch dug up the

remnants and ate those too.

On Wednesday Dog went off happily to find his bone, which of course was

not there!

He was furious and snarled at Bitch, who responded nonchalantly; “Haven’t you heard:

‘Every Dog has his day and every Bitch two afternoons, haha!”

All Rights reserved sirpeterjamescotcom©01.01.19

If you feel this article has value, please send this link to others, Writings are meant for people, not for dormant files in our computers and very often when we share them, it results in positive changes in the lives of individuals and communities.

If you are spiritually inclined see my other site; www.adcrucemchristi.com

Please feel free to send in questions (see ‘Contact’) and comments (hit ‘Comments’

button).

 

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The Little Prince – Book Review Part Two

The Little Prince 

In the original book review, I discussed aspects of the book written by Antoine De Saint-Exupery. See Previous publication.

However, as promised, I will now take you on a behind the scenes journey in terms of the lives of the author and his wife, Consuelo Suncin and finally the death of the author.

Continue reading The Little Prince – Book Review Part Two

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The Kite Runner

Kite Runner 10

A Novel by Khaled Hosseini – Book review by sirpeterjamesdotcom.

Khaled Hosseini is an Afghan-born American novelist and physician. After graduating from college, he worked as a doctor in California.Kite Runner

The Kite Runner became a bestseller after being printed in paperback and was popularized in book clubs. It was a number one New York Times bestseller for two years, with over seven million copies sold in the United States.

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